Saturday, October 18, 2014

Erasmus Campaign revisited - Star Wars X-Wing

Seems to me that I am a bit overdue with further posting in this blog, but those last months have been a bit busy.
However, we keep playing X-Wing in a more or less weekly basis. So far I have played the Erasmus campaign once as the Rebel. Although I was able to win the first mission I utterly lost the campaign. You can read a chronicle of our spoils here.

Now, I am playing it again but as Empire :) :)
So far we have managed to play the 1st mission, Satellite Malfunctions
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Mission Setup

Rebel

Points: 50, but a maximum of 2 ships
Ships: Any non-unique ship
Upgrades: Any non-unique droids, weapons upgrades, missile upgrades, and Pilot upgrades (if able to)
Setup: Anywhere in range 1 of the Rebel table side. Rebels place their ships first.

Imperial

Points: 50
Ships: Any non-unique standard Tie Fighter
Upgrades: Pilot upgrades (if able to)
Setup: Anywhere on any table edge (right, or left, or center), as long as it is range 3 away from the Rebel player's starting side. Rebels place their ships first.

Iniative: Rebels

Asteroids: Imperials place asteroids, but cannot be within range 2 of a satellite or range 1 of each other.

Two satellite tokens are placed by the Imperial player anywhere in range 2 of his side of the table. This means only range 2 and not in range 1. It also means left, center, and right sides. No sticking it in the corner!


Special Rules


·Echo System Satellite: The satellite has 5 hull points and can be targeted by weapons systems.  It cannot be critically hit and does not have any evade dice when fired at.


·Protect Action: Imperial ships may perform a PROTECT action when within range 1 of the satellite token.  When performing a PROTECT action, the Imperial player places one evade token on the satellite.  When attacked, the satellite may spend this evade token to add one additional success to its defensive total.  Note, this is the only way for the satellite to earn evade results.


Objectives


Rebel Victory: Destroy both Echo Net satellites.


If a Rebel Victory is secured, then they are allowed to add “Dutch” Vander (unique Y-wing pilot) to the Ships options for any future mission. If Dutch is killed in any mission, this option is no longer available.  Dutch is the leader of Gold Squadron of Y-wings and success in the Erasmus system brings Gold Squadron to the fight.


Imperial Victory:   The Rebel ships must be destroyed or driven off to ensure the Echo Net satellite is secure.


If the Echo Net system is secured, then the Rebel activity draws Maarek Stele's attention to the Erasmus system. Maarek Stele becomes an option for the Imperial Ship options for all future missions. If Maarek Stele is killed during a mission, he is no longer an option. 

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How we played it :)

Rebel:
Two Rookie Pilots with Proton Torpedoes (25p each)

Empire (me):
Two Academy Pilots (12p each)
Two Obsidian Squadron Pilots (13p each)

As imperial, I placed both, the Satellites and the Asteroids. As the Rebel player has placed his two ships on the center of his side of the board, I decided to put the satellites slightly towards the right part of my side, spaced 10cm (1 range) and then proceeded to place the asteroids as crowded as possible between the satellites and the rebel fighters.
[Note: as satellites we used two bomb tokens as I have forgotten part of my tokens at home :( ]
The two academy pilots deployed just behind the satellites and the idea was for them to stay there, flying in circles, to Protect the satellites.
The two obsidian squadron pilots were deployed on the lateral of the battlefield, perpendicular to the line Rebel fighters ---- Academy pilots.

The Rebel player decided to move straight ahead with his two rookie pilots, whereas I bank to the left with the two obsidian squadron pilots to cover not only this movement of the rebels but also to be able to pursue them in the case they would have bank or turn to their left to bypass the asteroid field on the side opposite to my deployment.
Prepare to die Rebel scum
The relative position of the ships made it possible for me to fire with the two of them at the same rebel fighter, whereas the rebels were not able to do so [evil grin].
Just there :)
On the second round, the rebels decided to split their formation, heading each to one different side of the asteroid in front of them; the Obsidian pilots just beard to their right to keep on the back of their targets.
Right behind you...


Not being able to fire back, the rebels were easy prey for the obsidian squadron :)
in space nobody can hear you
The lone rebel pilot tries to go for the satellites with the obsidian pilots in hot pursuit and the academy pilots turning to confront him.
between bad and worse
Some nice manoeuvring amongst the asteroids leads to a packed space :)
out of my way...
After a round of running and a K-turn, the rebel lone fighter faces all the enemy TIEs which try to Protect the satellites.
Alone against the odds
Rebel without fear
However the concentrated fire from the imperial fighters was too much for the rebel scum...
Another one bites the dust

In retrospective, the placement of the asteroids relative to the rebel fighters and the fact that they decided to fly straight ahead allowing the two obsidians to rain upon them from the side was probably the decisive factor of the game.
Last time I played it as Rebel I tried to focus on flying to the satellites ignoring the imperial fighters which were chasing me all over the board, all of them; which resulted in their failure to protect the satellites. I tried to avoid that error by letting two fighters protecting them all the time, which at the end resulted in a victory for the empire :)
The rebel player also was sharing this opinion concerning the placement and route of his ships, maybe if he would have made them fly to their left side towards the opposite side of the board the obsidian pilots would have a more difficult task.
Anyway, we really enjoyed it. We like this campaign as it allows you to introduce new players in a soft and progressive way which makes the game easier to approach. Currently there are too many different ships and upgrades for new players to get everything in their heads straight away.
Next, mission 2...







Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Starwars X-Wing - Some thoughts and Tech details (Part 1)

In the aftermath of playing the Erasmus Campaing (cf. previous post about it), I was trying to design some own scenarios for X-Wing which were able to tell a story. My idea was to put more focus in an interesting scenario than in a balanced one.
However, while I was pondering how to implement my not-so-clear ideas into a working set of scenarios and their story line, I ran into several questions concerning dimensions and time (read game rounds) involved in a typical game; such things like how many rounds will take a certain ship to go from point A to point B and similar technical issues. As I was not having my core set with me, I tried to find some of the info I needed on the web, however, I was not able to find all the info I wanted out there so later, when it was again possible to me, I measured it myself, make some pictures and thought a bit about the metagame issues involved.

Before I go amok in this post, let me warn you. I am not a guru nor an expert on the game, on the contrary, I am a beginner, maybe very enthusiastic, but still a beginner; so look to whatever I say with this in mind. Maybe some things I say are sound, maybe some are silly or obvious, maybe totally wrong. If you do not agree or have a (better / different) opinion, please, be my guest, let a comment and discuss it :)

Ok, let's take a look to the dimensions of the game components.

Normal ship base
The normal ship base is 4 cm by 4 cm, which is exactly the same as the length of the maneuver template straight 1. Each straight maneuver template is also exactly 4 cm longer than the previous one. So the maneuver template straight 5 is 20 cm long, the straight 4 is 16 cm long and so on.
This implies that any normal ship will move a minimum distance of 8 cm (4 cm for the template plus 4 cm for the base), a maximum distance of 24 cm (4 cm for the base and 20 cm for the straight 5 template) and always in 4 cm (or one ship base) increments (due to the increment of 4 cm from one straight template to the next one).
How translate this into useful information for you?
Well, it depends on your ability for eyeballing distances on a boardgame table, of course, but if you look to the gaming table and you see where you normal 4 cm base ship is, it should not be too difficult for you to guest a distance based on the size of the base of the ship. My point being that your reference template (straight 1) is already on the table in the form of the base of the ship.
This also applies to the barrel roll action, although in this case you do not need to eyeball any distance as the barrel roll is an action which can only be performed if legal and as the rules say and the FAQ confirms, measuring distances is not allowed during the Planning phase (cf. page 6 of the rules); however barrel roll take place during the Activation phase wherein not nothing is said about pre-measurements. Also, on page 8 of the rules says that you may measure the barrel roll before committing to it.

Range ruler
The range ruler goes in 10 cm increments. So, range 1 goes from 0 cm to 10 cm, range 2 from 10 cm to 20 cm and range 3 from 20 cm to 30 cm.
Target Lock allows you to measure the distance (read range) to a target before committing. Also, in the Combat phase, you can measure the distance (read range) to any other ship before declaring it as target (cf. rule book page 10, right column).
If you try to remember that distance from the Combat phase for your next Planning phase, you will have a very good (read accurate) guest of the real distance in centimeters between those two ships, which you can use to choose your maneuver.

Large ship base
I just opened my Slave I expansion pack only to measure the base, which, surprise, surprise, is 8 cm long. Same story than with the normal base. Do you have a large ship on the board ? then, look to its base and start guessing how much afar another ship is.

Some meta-gaming thoughts / facts
The standard playing area is 3' to 3', or 90 cm to 90 cm.

A normal ship touching one border is 86 cm away from the other border.
The maximum distance this ship will move is 24 cm per round with a straight 5 (if able to use this maneuver of course, currently only the A-wing is this fast for the Rebels, whereas  only the TIE bomber is not so fast for the Empire). If you move straight ahead at this maximum speed, the front of the ship's base will be at 28 cm from the starting border at the end of round 1 (4 cm for the initial position of the base, 20 cm for the template straight 5 and again 4 cm for the base), at 52 cm at the end of round 2, at 76 cm at the end of round 3 and at 100 cm (and totally outside of the playing area) at the end of round 4.
At a speed of straight 4 (maximum speed of the TIE bomber and all the Rebel-Wings except the A-Wing), a ship will move "only" 20 cm per round; therefore it will be at 24 cm at the end of round 1 (4 cm for the initial position of the base, 16 cm for the template straight 4 and again 4 cm for the base), at 44 cm at the end of round 2, at 64 cm at the end of round 3, at 84 cm at the end of round 4 and at 104 cm (again well outside the playing area) at the end of round 5.

A large ship touching the starting border is only 82 cm from the other edge.
The YT-1300 (aka Millennium Falcon) and the Firespray-31 (aka Slave I) can move at speed straight 4 (which we know is 16 cm long), which amount to 24 cm per round which is as fast as a normal ship at straight 5 speed (!).
Therefore at the end of round 1, the front of the ship base will be at 32 cm from the starting border (8 cm for the initial position of the base, 16 cm for the template straight 4 and again 8 cm for the base), at the end of round 2 it will be at 56 cm, at the end of round 3 at 80 cm and outside of the playing area at the end of round 4.
The Lambda Shuttle moves "only" at a maximum speed of straight 3, which amounts to 12 cm for the template and 8 cm for the base resulting in a total movement of 20 cm, again as fast as the second best speed of a normal ship, the straight 4 speed.
Therefore the front of the Lambda's base will be at 28 cm from the starting border at the end of round 1, at 48 cm at the end of round 2, at 68 cm at the end of round 3, at 88 cm at the end of round 4 and outside of the playing area at the end of round 5.

In short, flying at maximum speed from one side to the other takes 4 rounds for the fastest ships and 5 rounds for the second fastest ships; the size of the ship (normal or large) does not matter.

I tried to make a nice table with the straight forward movement of the ships but the outcome does not look so nice :( although the info there is fine.

For normal ships (4 cm base) the movement table looks like this
Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Template
1 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80 88 96 104 112 120
2 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120
3 16 32 48 64 80 96 112 128
4 20 40 60 80 100 120
5 24 48 72 96 120

For Large ships (8 cm base) the movement table is
Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Template
1 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120
2 16 32 48 64 80 96 112 128
3 20 40 60 80 100 120
4 24 48 72 96 120

On the tables, the starting position of the ships is NOT taken into account; they only show how many centimeters will a ship move in a straight line if it keeps doing the same maneuver every round. I stopped the table at 120 cm as it will be more distance than the length of any gaming table.

Hope you find it useful.

I will post this now, but will keep adding things in the next few days.
Happy gaming !

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Sentinels of the Multiverse Vengeance - Unboxing

Finally released, finally here:
The last expansion for Sentinels of the Multiverse, a box called Vengeance.
Obviously we have not played yet, so here there will be only some pictures of the box and the contents as well as a few technical details.
Vengeance, as opened. 
Vengeance, display of contents
Vengeance, cards

According to the back of the box, the expansion consists of:



339 63mm x 88mm cards
  • 9 Hero Character cards
  • 5 Hero decks of 40 cards each
  • 5 Vengeance Villain decks of 20 cards each
  • 2 Environment decks of 15 cards each
5 102mm x 153mm Vengeance Villain Character cards
12 76mm x 89mm divider cards
1 Rule book


Technical details

The box measures are 29cm x 20cm x 8cm. The inside is divided in three parts as you can appreciate in the previous pictures (sorry for the reflections, it was sunny outside ;D )
The cards, according to the back of the box the cards are 63mm x 88mm, however in my experience this is not 100% accurate.
For my copy of the base game (Sentinels of the Multiverse Enhanced Edition) I was able to use the Ultra Pro-Fit 64mm x 89mm sleeves, which however where too narrow for the cards of the Rook City expansion.
However, the cards of the Rook City expansion and, as far as I know any other expansion including this last one, Vengeance,  fit perfectly in the Swan 65mm x 90mm sleeves.

That is all for now, I'm afraid :)

Happy gaming !




Saturday, February 15, 2014

Star Wars X-Wing revisited and Erasmus Campaign

Long time ago...

actually only more than one year ago I got my copy of the core set of the Star Wars X-wing miniatures game and wrote a more or less I-hate-you-maybe-could-like-you post bzw. review about it.
That day I played three or four games, but only the first two scenarios of the Core Set book and only with the one X-wing and the two TIEs from that set.
I did not play again...

...until one week ago :)

A friend of mine has been collecting (more or less) the game and so far he has two models of the "basic" starships, namely the X-Wing, Y-Wing, A-Wing, the TIEs, advance TIE, interceptor and I think he also has some of the big ships, anyway, the point is, he has more models than the ones on the core set alone.
He has also been trying to get us to play the game. He actually managed to play a four people scenario (I was not there) and it seemed to be better than my experience so far.

Two weeks ago we were talking about free time (lack of), games and things and stuff and we find ourselves talking about X-wing and how disappointed I was with the game.
He has found a very nice campaign on the web, the Erasmus campaign at a web called themetalbikini.com although the original one is still being discussed at BoardGameGeek.
This campaign has revived my interest in the game. The idea behind is very elegant and remembers me of something I found once, long time ago when I was playing AT-43. Basically the idea is you start small and slowly build up the game.
The campaign has four scenarios and the first once is only 50 points each side, no named pilots, no bi ships, so basically Wave 1 fighters.
We did that one week ago. It was great !
The first mission resembles the scenario 3 from the core set. In the core set, the empire starships have to "read" some satellites, in the Erasmus mission the Rebels have to destroy two satellites which the empire fighters can "protect" (special action for the mission).
It was a blast !
You can find some pictures and a nice narrative on the blog that this friend of mine has just created to follow not only this game but also future games.
Yes, future games. We are going to keep playing :)

So far we have played the first and the second mission of this Erasmus campaign.
The second mission is kind of weird. There are like three versions around, the one in themetalbikini and when we looked it up in boardgamegeek the one there, which have been updated recently.
The apparent problem with this mission seems to be that it is very difficult for the Rebels to win. The idea is similar to the shuttle mission from the core set and have the same problems.
A shuttle starts on one side of the board and moves towards the other side at a maximum speed forwards of 2, so in more or less 5 to 6 rounds will be out of the board and in safety.
One force (Empire, for example) escorts the shuttle and deploy on the same side where the shuttle starts.
The opposing force (Rebels, for example) has to attack the shuttle and deploy on the border of the board towards the one the shuttle moves and they get there their reinforcements !!!
That is insane. For the defending player there is no motivation to finish off any attacking enemy fighter as immediately a new, fresh fighter will appear right in front of the shuttle.
I think this kind of North to South engagement with reinforcements is broken in design.
In my opinion a far better idea will be to make the attacking force to deploy not opposite to the shuttle but perpendicular to it, so instead of a North - South deployment, it will be a North-East (or North-West) deployment, with the opposing forces on 90° of each other. Of course, the attacking force should be limited to deploy closer to the middle line of the table, let say, in a range of plus, minus 2 from this line.
With this deployment, if the defending player manages to destroy a ship early in the game, the reinforcements will appear not in front of the shuttle but on one side, so the defending player should also consider to move the shuttle sideways and not only run forwards, but if this players destroys an attacking fighter later in the game, the reinforcement will appear behind, which sometimes can be a bad thing, but here means that the attacker will have to speed up to catch the shuttle.
We did not try this scenario, but I will not mind to do it.
The patch we used was to forbid the deployment of reinforcements below range 3 of the shuttle, but still, it does not feels right.

We are going to play the third mission next week. This mission is similar to the second mission of the core set, wherein Luke is trapped in the middle of the table with some hyperspace problem and has to survive some rounds and then escape.
The Erasmus mission actually has a named pilot of the Rebel Alliance in the middle of the board with some asteroids lying around who has to run away from the empire forces into safety (out board).
You would say that this is stupidly easy, just pick up the best pilot of an A-Wing and run like hell. Well, that will work for an isolated scenario, but this is a campaign, so you "win" this named pilot if he survives the scenario for the final mission of the campaign, which coincidentally is a full combat mission, so maybe your very fast rabbit is not the kind of guy you will like to have in a heavy fight and being a progressive campaign, he will be the only named pilot you will have there (except Vander if the Rebels also won the first mission and he didn't dye in the second, which is my case :C )

Anyway, I thought it will be a nice idea to re-evaluate my previous post concerning this game. It seems to be that with more ships and good scenarios (and maybe the proper opponent) it can be a lot of fun.
So far I am playing again and I just ordered some more miniatures, nothing big, a second core set (very nice deal, an X-wing and two TIEs plus all the rest for the same price than the three fighters per se) (yeah, I know, the special pilots are not there, but their cards are already available on the web, so how cares), a third X-wing, a Y-wing and two adv. TIEs, which is roughly 100 point per side (actually only 86 on the Rebel side, but still enough for me).

I decided to stick to the Wave 1 ships, get to know them, play some more scenarios, maybe design a campaign together with this friend of mine and how knows?, maybe I finish buying all the rest of the stuff. The models look awesome anyway.

By the way, if you have any ideas for a campaign, a scenario or maybe already done some of this or know a place where to find some nice ones, it will be great if you drop us a comment with the info :)





Thursday, January 16, 2014

Star Trek Attack Wing - Unboxing

Last year I was, for sure, very brave and good, so Xmas time was full of nice presents for me :)

One of them was the core set of Stark Trek Attack Wing


The game comes with three different ships, one for each initial faction on the game, the humans, the romulans and the klingons.
Five cardboards with all the tokens and movement templates are also in the box. I must said that I still did not play the game, only read the rules and listened to some podcasts about it, so I cannot give an opinion on the actual use of some of the tokens.
 As you can see, the humans got three possible commanders  for their starship whereas the klingons and romulans only two.

Also in the box is the ruler for range measurement, the dices, cards for the three factions and damage cards and the planet token, a huge piece of cardboard which could be great as Death Star for the X-Wing.

There has been already too much discussion on the web concerning the quality and merits of both games, this and the X-Wing. One of the main critics to this one being the poor quality of the models.
I have to say that I am forced to agree on this. The ones on X-Wing really look like painted miniatures, you know, with the shadows and dirt and this feeling that they are almost real. The ones in this game have a monochrome plastic color with some highlights in other colors, they really look like toy starships.
As I was taking a look to the components, a non-geek, non-gamer friend was present and when confronted with the two boxes, the Attack Wing and the X-Wing, there was no doubt which ones qualified as "toys" and which ones as "models". This friend of mine was scared about touching the ones from the X-Wing, they looked more delicate to handle :)
This will be my only critic concerning this game, because even if it is true that it is heavily based on X-Wing (no surprise here, Wizkids got the right for this particular game system and design from Fantasy Flight Games), they are really two different games.
Before I continue, I must again said that I barely played X-Wing and that I never played (yet) Attack Wing. However, from what I experienced on my few X-Wing games is that the game seems to be designed to involve several ships, and by several I mean two or three squadrons on each side, so we are talking about two imperial squadrons each one having two Tie Fighter and one advance Tie Fighter (like in Star Wars, the movie, when Darth Vader goes rebel hunting) and maybe one rebel squadron consisting of two X-Wing and one Y-Wing. Of course depending on the final points. My gaming groups was playing even four players games and seems to agree with this. Several ships are the scale of this game. Some people on the web also seem to support this idea.
Attack Wing includes not two but three factions with specific rules for it already on the rule book and the scale seems to be focused not on several ships but on one or maximum two ships per side. The included missions seem to reinforce this impression as they are based on sending crew members outside of the starship (away teams) to pursue the mission objectives. Also the crew aspect seems to be a heavy component of the game play. Again, not direct experience here, only my first impressions based on the rule book and what I was able to find on the web.
Hope to be able to find time to play soon to test the game. It looks very nice.











Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Norway - A road trip - Part II

I just decided to post the second part of the post even if it is not finished yet as it is already end of August and if I do not publish it now maybe I do not do it ever.
I will try to update this second part with the rest of the information as soon as I have the time to do so.

Campings

We were having the intention to alternate resting at a camping place and on our own. It turned out that the possibility for the second was not so obvious without a more deep knowledge of the area than the one we were in possession of, basically a detailed map of the Lofoten Islands. We managed, however, to find a nice spot in one or two occasions.
The camping places we visited were in general terms good to very good, with, of course, the usual small thing here and there. All of them were able to provide fresh water, electricity, cooking, shower and toilet facilities, however not all of them accepted cards as payment method, or were prepared for the deposition of waste water (both, the "grey" water and/or the septic tank) or had internet access.

  • Lofoten Hammerstad Sjøhuscamping, located a few kilometres north of Svolvær, this camping was our first point of contact with Norwegian hospitality. The owner, a very nice guy called Kjell, was happy to help you with anything, from advise about fishing up to withdrawing cash from your credit card for you. The camping place is not so big, it is located down hill looking to a small and rocky beach, has a pier and it is very close to a bridge over the fjord waters were you can try your luck fishing (on the way back, with proper fishing rods, we got a nice codfish here). The entry to the camping area is well indicated but easy to pass by if you are driving to fast. We stayed here two different night, one on the way to Å i Lofoten, the other on the way back from there. The shower runs with 5 NOK coins, the only camping place we were which used this coin, the other were using 10 NOK, for 3 minutes. There two shower rooms and four toilet spaces on an annex to the cabin number 3, which is hill up from the place were the campers are parked. That is also the place to empty the septic water, so if your septic tank does not have wheels, you will need to heavy it up to there. To empty the grey water you will need to manoeuvre a bit with the camper, but is easy done. We did not use the washing machine but according to Mr. Kjell it was possible, we just need to go to him with the stuff and his wife will help us. Internet was available all over the place. A very nice place to stay on a trip to the Lofoten, we liked it, specially the cover kitchen with barbecue inside :) The price was 185 NOK per night with electricity, 145 NOK without electricity, plus an extra per person.
  • Lyngær Lofoten Bobilcamping, easily the biggest camping place we stayed. According to the brochure we got it has space for around 200 campers. The people at the reception were very friendly, and able to communicate in German and English. As around 70% of their customers are from Germany, their German was obviously better than their English. Of course, this applies only to the Norwegian stuff, as a guy from Pakistan or India was also working there as well as a Spanish girl. The place overlooks the fjord, has a pier and owns a rowing boat which one it is possible to go fishing (we got nothing here, however). There are a lot of facilities here, empty of the grey water and septic tank is easily done at one service building, together with the refilling of fresh water. Another service building houses the washing and drying machines. Both service buildings have a kitchen, toilets and showers (10 NOK for I think 3 or 4 minutes). I can not remember for sure if the place was having internet available, but I think so.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Norway - A road trip - Part I

We just came back from holidays in Norway, a road trip which started in Romaniemi (Finland), went to the Lofoten Islands and ended back in Romaniemi. The trip was great, with some fantastic moments but also with some down moments. This is, more or less, the story :)

Background 

We were two families with kids. One family was of three members, two adults and a baby girl of 16 months of age; the other family was of four members, two adults, a girl of 4 years and a boy of 2 years old. Both ladies were happily  pregnant.We rented two campers from the company Touring Cars which has branches all over the Scandinavian countries. The reason to take the campers on Romaniemi (Finland) instead of directly on Norway was the price difference. In Norway the high season includes already the first two weeks of June, whereas in Finland only the two last weeks of June are considered high season. Therefore the rental price was around 95€ per day instead of 270€ per day.The campers were Hymer-Ford, of the "capuchine" type, they were not identical but very similar. The main difference was that one was having a permanent bed on the back of the camper whereas the other one was having a living space which could be transformed into a bed. On the middle of the camper there is the main table, which can also be transformed into a bed and then on the front roof, there is the other bed. So, every camper was having three beds, which was more than enough for our needs.The family with the two kids got the camper with the living space on the back site. This configuration reduces the storage space accessible from the outside of the camper, but once the living space in transformed into a bed, gives a lot of space for storage just below the bed. The distance from the bed to the floor of the camper is not so high and a little one falling from there to the ground will suffer only a minor scratch (real case). As the two kids were sharing this bed and the parents were using the upper one, the table in the middle was always open as table, so no modification of the camper was needed on a daily basis.The family with the baby girl got the camper with the permanent bed on the back side. The distance from this bed to the floor of the camper is higher than on the other model, maybe more than one meter (4 feet, even), and there was a indication that the bed was not suitable for a baby between 0 and 6 years, the same applies to the bed on top of the driving seats. So, the whole family shared the bed on the back so that the baby was not able to fall down to the ground. So, in this case the camper was probably oversized for us but still not a big problem.

Route

This here is a image capture of a google map with the relevant points on the trip. As stated, we arrived to Rovaniemi by plane, took the campers and cross into Sweden following the road to Pello (Finland) toward Narvik (Norway). Short of Narwik we went north into the Lofoten. At the Lofoten we visit some places that are not in this picture, but the main path is accurate. In Andenes we stop to take a boat to see the whales (more on that later) and cross towards Senja with the ferry (more on ferries later).
At the end we travel 2108 km at an average speed of 62 km/h, which I think it is quite good.

Practicalities

The Scandinavian countries share a lot of features, such as an amazing landscape, but also differ in a lot of small things which can make you live not so easy.
Currency: Finland is in the Euro-zone and therefore uses Euro as currency. Norway and Sweden on the other hand still have their own national currencies. All the three countries take credit cards and even debit cards, but not everywhere. For example, in Norway, on Henningsvær, we were almost not able to buy dried codfish as the factory was not able to accept cards and we were having not enough cash and the absence of a cash machine (we were told that the closest one was in Svolvær, which was a few kilometres out of our way having passing that city already the previous day).
Gas bottles: the camper uses gas for heating, cooking and for the fridge if you are not plug to the electricity network in a camping area. Our one was equipped with two bottles of around 15 litres each. It is possible to buy gas bottles on any petrol station. However, the connection piece on the top of the bottle differs in each Scandinavian country, so our Finish camper required Finish gas bottles. I was a bit worried that we were going to run out of gas in the middle of Norway, but at the end, we arrived to Rovaniemi without having emptied even one of the two.
Mosquitoes: They say Finland is the country of the thousand lakes, better say the country of the million of mosquitoes. They manage to get inside of the camper even with all windows closed. We were only on Finland upon arrival and prior to our departure, so in total not more than two-three days, but it was enough for us to get devoured by the mosquitoes. Norway, having not so many lakes, but more running water and specially salt water fjords is basically mosquitoes free.
Reindeer: As with the mosquitoes, they are absent from Norway, at least from the Lofoten area, but plenty on the border area between Sweden and Finland. You will find them on the side of the road, walking, crossing or just looking to you. They are look tamed and quiet, but we did try to approach them, just took some pictures from the camper. Other drivers can flash you the lights to indicate you that you are going to find some reindeer on the road ahead of you.
Camper drivers: According to the guy in the rental agency, it is a common custom between the drivers of campers to greet each other on the road. I tried to do every time, but I will say that only three quarters answered, although I also have to say that I was not always the first one to initiate the greeting.
Road: The E10 which we followed is quite narrow. It has two lanes, one in each direction but there is no space on you right further than the lane. Once the lane finished there is a more or less abrupt drop in the terrain. You should picture the road as slightly elevated over the surrounding terrain, so if you drive out of the lane you will fall with the camper maybe a good meter in some places. The main road, E10, is pretty well maintained, however some irregularities and holes are to be expected, as well as the required maintenance works, which in one case, when we were driving towards Å i Lofoten were quite annoying as they were quite extensive and intensive.


I also wanted to talk a bit about the camping places and the places we visited and the activities and so on, but I will do in other posts, otherwise this post will be enormous and I will never finish and publish it.